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The Molecular Machinery of Intracellular Protein Degradation: Structural Studies ex situ and in situ
by Wolfgang Baumeister
(Department of Molecular Structural Biology, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Martinsried, Germany)
When
22nd September 2016
at 5 PM
Where
Refectory of Augustinian Abbey Mendlovo namesti 1a, Brno. No capacity limitations. The entry is free for everybody.
Who
Lecturer photo

Wolfgang Baumeister studied biology, chemistry and physics at the Universities of Muenster and Bonn, Germany, and he obtained his Ph.D. from the University of Dusseldorf in 1973. From 1973-1980 he was Research Associate in the Department of Biophysics at the University of Duesseldorf. He held a Heisenberg Fellowship spending time at the Cavendish Laboratory in Cambridge, England (1980-1981). In 1982 he became a Group Leader at the Max-Planck-Institute of Biochemistry in Martinsried, Germany and in 1988 Director and Head of the Department of Structural Biology. He is also an Honorary Professor on the Physics Faculty at the Technical University in Munich. In 2000 he was named Moore Distinguished Scholar at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, USA.
Wolfgang Baumeister made seminal contributions to our understanding of the structure and function of the cellular machinery of protein degradation, in particular the proteasome. Moreover, he pioneered the development of cryo-electron tomography. His contributions to science were recognized by numerous awards including the Otto Warburg Medal, the Schleiden Medal, the Louis-Jeantet Prize for Medicine, the Stein and Moore Award, the Harvey Prize in Science and Technology and the Ernst Schering Prize. He is a member of several academies including the US National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Baumeister Lab

Molecular Mechanisms of Meiotic Chromosome Segregation in Eukaryotes
by Yoshinori Watanabe
(Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, University of Tokyo, Japan)
When
6th October 2016
at 5 PM
Where
Refectory of Augustinian Abbey Mendlovo namesti 1a, Brno. No capacity limitations. The entry is free for everybody.
Who
Lecturer photo

Yoshinori Watanabe is a Professor at the Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences at the University of Tokyo, Japan. He received his PhD from the University of Tokyo in molecular biology. He then became a Research Associate in the Department of Biophysics and Biochemistry at the same Institution followed by a visiting research fellow position at the Imperial Cancer Research Institute in London, UK. He has received a number of awards including the Kihara Memorial Prize for Science in 2008. His research focuses on chromosome segregation and the research in his labs aims to elucidate the fundamental principles of chromosome segregation using fission yeast. To understand the conservation of the findings in yeast or the specific regulation in high eukaryotes he also studies human cells or knock-out mice.

Watanabe laboratory

Design Principles of Pluripotency
by Austin Smith
(Department of Biochemistry, University of Cambridge/Wellcome Trust/MRC Cambridge Stem Cell Institute, UK)
When
10th November 2016
at 5 PM
Where
Refectory of Augustinian Abbey Mendlovo namesti 1a, Brno. No capacity limitations. The entry is free for everybody.
Who
Lecturer photo

As an undergraduate in Oxford Austin Smith became captivated by pluripotency He pursued this interest through PhD studies in Edinburgh and postdoctoral research back in Oxford. He returned to Edinburgh as a Group Leader in 1990 and from 1996 was Director of the Centre for Genome Research, later the Institute for Stem Cell Research. In 2006 he moved to Cambridge where he was the founding Director of the Stem Cell Institute.

Professor Smith is a Medical Research Council Professor, an EMBO Member, and a Fellow of the Royal Societies of Edinburgh and of London. In 2010 he was awarded the Louis Jeantet Prize and in 2016 he received the ISSCR McEwen award for Innovation.

Cambridge Stem Cell Institute

The Genetic Apparatus, from Mendel to Critical Issues in Contemporary Medicine
by Ada Yonath
(Department of Structural Biology, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel)
When
2nd March 2017
at 5 PM
Where
Refectory of Augustinian Abbey Mendlovo namesti 1a, Brno. No capacity limitations. The entry is free for everybody.
Who
Lecturer photo

Ada E. Yonath (born 22 June 1939) is an Israeli crystallographer best known for her pioneering work on the structure of the ribosome. She is the current director of the Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Center for Biomolecular Structure and Assembly of the Weizmann Institute of Science. In 2009, she received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry along with Venkatraman Ramakrishnan and Thomas A. Steitz for her studies on the structure and function of the ribosome, becoming the first Israeli woman to win the Nobel Prize out of ten Israeli Nobel laureates, the first woman from the Middle East to win a Nobel prize in the sciences, and the first woman in 45 years to win the Nobel Prize for Chemistry. However, she said herself that there was nothing special about a woman winning the Prize.

Ada Yonath group

Meiosis, Recombination and the Origin of a Species
by Peter Donnelly
(Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford / Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, UK)
When
16th March 2017
at 5 PM
Where
Refectory of Augustinian Abbey Mendlovo namesti 1a, Brno. No capacity limitations. The entry is free for everybody.
Who
Lecturer photo

Peter James Donnelly, FRS FMedSci (born 15 May 1959) is an Australian mathematician and Professor of Statistical Science at the University of Oxford. He is a specialist in applied probability and has made contributions to coalescent theory. His research group at Oxford has an international reputation for the development of statistical methodology to analyze genetic data. When elected to a chair at Queen Mary College, London in 1988 Donnelly was only 29, and possibly the youngest Professor in Great Britain. He held a chair at the University of Chicago (1994–96) and was head of the Department of Statistics at the University of Oxford from 1996 to 2001. Since 2007, he has been Director, Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics (WTCHG) in Oxford, where he is currently based. He is a fellow at St Anne's College, Oxford. Many leading statistical geneticists worked with Donnelly as young researchers including David Balding, Carsten Wiuf, Matthew Stephens and Jonathan Pritchard. One area in which he has a leading reputation is in the interpretation of DNA evidence. He has acted as an expert witness on forensic science in criminal trials. He is noted for his collaborative work with biologists. He has been heavily involved in a number of large scale projects, such as the International HapMap Project and the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium, a genome-wide association study.

 Research group

Chronic Kidney Disease: The Mendelian Surprise
by Friedhelm Hildebrandt
(Harvard Medical School / Boston Children's Hospital / Howard Hughes Medical Institute, USA)
When
23rd March 2017
at 5 PM
Where
Refectory of Augustinian Abbey Mendlovo namesti 1a, Brno. No capacity limitations. The entry is free for everybody.
Who
Lecturer photo

Dr. Hildebrandt is an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the Warren E. Grupe Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard University. He is the chief of nephrology at Boston Children’s Hospital. Dr. Hildebrandt’s work is concerned with the identification and functional characterization of recessive single-gene causes of kidney diseases in children. His group has identified over 30 novel kidney disease genes. This work implicated the primary cilium and centrosomes in nephronophthisis, thereby contributing to the identification of “ciliopathies” as a new class of human disease. Gene identification also extends to nephrotic syndrome and congenital malformations of the kidney and urinary tract. His lab studies the function of newly identified disease genes in disease models of mice and zebrafish. We developed efficient methods for gene identification using whole exome resequencing and other highly-parallel sequencing techniques. Recently, we showed that DNA damage repair plays a role in the pathogenesis of ciliopathies (Chaki et al. Cell 150:355-48, 2012; Zhou et al., Nat Genet 44:910-15, 2012).

 

Hildebrandt laboratory

Lighting up RNA Interactions in Living Cells
by David Tollervey
(Wellcome Trust Centre for Cell Biology, University of Edinburgh, UK)
When
20th April 2017
at 5 PM
Where
Refectory of Augustinian Abbey Mendlovo namesti 1a, Brno. No capacity limitations. The entry is free for everybody.
Who
Lecturer photo

David Tollervey is a biologist and expert in ribosome synthesis and RNA processing — processes required for the manufacture of proteins within cells. David discovered that yeast and other small organisms contain many small species of RNA in their nucleolus, a substructure within the nucleus of the cell. He subsequently showed that these small nucleolar RNAs are required for the manufacture of ribosomes and therefore for protein synthesis.

He has long been a world leader in ribosome synthesis and RNA quality control, having characterised the remarkable protein complex known as the exosome, which can break down RNA molecules. The technology and tools that David’s research laboratory has developed in yeast have considerable potential for enhancing our understanding of disease states, including infection with viruses and Escherichia coli bacteria.

David is currently a Wellcome Trust Principal Research Fellow, Professor of RNA Biology and Director of the Wellcome Trust Centre for Cell Biology at the University of Edinburgh. He has also published over 150 papers in the field of RNA processing and quality control within cells.

Tollervey lab

FRIDAY!!! Grid Cells and Neural Maps of Space
by May-Britt Moser
(Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience / Centre for Neural Computation, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway)
When
5th May 2017
at 5 PM
Where
FRIDAY!!! Refectory of Augustinian Abbey Mendlovo namesti 1a, Brno. No capacity limitations. The entry is free for everybody.
Who
Lecturer photo

May-Britt Moser (born 4 January 1963) is a Norwegian psychologist, neuroscientist, and head of department of the Centre for Neural Computation at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU). She and her then-husband, Edvard Moser, pioneered research on the brain's mechanism for representing space together with their mentor John O'Keefe. They shared the 2014 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with O'Keefe,[1] awarded for work concerning the grid cells in the entorhinal cortex, as well as several additional space-representing cell types in the same circuit that make up the positioning system in the brain. Moser discovered types of cells that are important for determining position (spatial representation) close to the hippocampus, an area located in the center of the brain. Moser investigated correlations between the anatomical structure of the hippocampus and social learning in rats. Moser's work gave the ability for scientists to gain new knowledge into the cognitive processes and spacial deficits associated with human neurological conditions such as Alzheimer's disease.

The Mosers were educated at the University of Oslo and were appointed associate professors in psychology and neuroscience at NTNU in 1996. They were instrumental in the establishment of the Centre for the Biology of Memory (CBM) in 2002 and the Institute for Systems Neuroscience at NTNU in 2007. The Moser's were 1 in 5 other couples to win a Nobel Prize.

May-Britt Moser was awarded a degree in psychology from the University of Oslo in 1990. She thereafter was awarded her Ph.D. in Neurophysiology from the University of Oslo in 1995,[4] under the supervision of professor Per Andersen. Moser went on to undertake postdoctoral training with Richard Morris at the Centre for Neuroscience, University of Edinburgh from 1994 to 1996, and was a visiting postdoctoral fellow at the laboratory of John O'Keefe at the University College, London for two months.

Moser returned to Norway in 1996 to be appointed associate professor in biological psychology at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) in Trondheim. She was promoted to a position as full professor of neuroscience at NTNU in 2000. Moser is also head of department of the NTNU Centre for Neural Computation. She was awarded one quarter of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2014, along with her husband Edvard, with the other half going to John O'Keefe.[5] She also is a member of the Royal Norwegian Society of Sciences and Letters,[6] Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters,[7] and the Norwegian Academy of Technological Sciences.[8]

May-Britt Moser was a co-Founder of the Centre for the Biology of Memory, a Research Council-funded Centre of Excellence from 2003 to 2012, and has taken on the Directorship of the Centre for Neural Computation, with a life time from 2013 to 2022.

 

Moser group

Mechanisms in DNA Mismatch Repair
by Paul Modrich
(Department of Biochemistry, Duke University Medical Center / Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Durham, USA)
When
18th May 2017
at 5 PM
Where
Refectory of Augustinian Abbey Mendlovo namesti 1a, Brno. No capacity limitations. The entry is free for everybody.
Who
Lecturer photo

Paul Lawrence Modrich (* 13. června 1946 Raton ve státě Nové Mexiko) je americký chemik chorvatského původu, který v roce 2015 získal Nobelovu cenu za chemii společně sTomasem Lindahlem a Azizem Sancarem za výzkum v oblasti oprav deoxyribonukleové kyseliny (DNA). Paul Modrich popsal mechanismus, kterým buňky ověřují, že „písmena“DNA nejsou při kopírování či úpravě přeházena či špatně zapsána.

Paul Modrich studoval na Stanfordově univerzitě a na Massachusettském technologickém institutu, kde roku 1973 získal doktorát. Dnes působí jako profesor biochemie na Dukeově univerzitě a jako výzkumník v ústavu Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

Modrich lab